The data behind Netflix cancellations, and Billie Eilish’s latest song premiere by the numbers: Datacenter Weekly

Welcome to Ad Age Datacenter Weekly, our data-obsessed newsletter for marketing and media professionals. Reading this online? Sign up to get it delivered to your inbox here.

Cancel culture

“Netflix has countered accusations that it disproportionately cancels more shows than other networks and platforms by revealing data around the percentage of shows that it renews,” Deadline’s Peter White reports. “The streamer’s Global Head of TV Bela Bajaria revealed that it has a program renewal rate of around 67%—something that she said was in line with industry standards.” The revelation came during the Paley International Council Summit. Keep reading here.

Previously:  “Netflix raises U.S. subscription price in sign of confidence” (Oct. 29), per Bloomberg News (via Ad Age).

Risk factor

“How likely is it you’ll encounter at least one person who is infected with the coronavirus if you go to a bar in Denver?,” asks Deborah Netburn of the Los Angeles Times. “What about a 100-person wedding in Baltimore? Or a Thanksgiving dinner with 25 guests in Los Angeles?”

Netburn serves up very specific numerical answers to the questions she poses with help from “the free, intuitive and now peer-reviewed” COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool out of Georgia Tech. Check out the tool here—and keep reading Netburn’s take on it here.

Masked data

As Phillip W. Magness writes in a guest post in The Wall Street Journal, “The top scientific journal Nature Medicine published a study on Oct. 23 with an astounding claim: By simply wearing masks at higher rates, Americans could prevent as many as 130,000 COVID-19 fatalities by the end of February 2021. Produced by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics Evaluation, or IHME, the study garnered immediate acclaim.”

But Magness thinks Nature Medicine has it all wrong, because the journal relied on outdated data about mask usage. There just isn’t that much more mask-adoption to be had in this country, he argues, which means the 130,000 lives-saved figure could be way overstated. Keep reading here.

Who is Magness?  His Twitter bio reads, “Economic & political historian. I do data analysis about the past & present. Lockdowns do not work.” He’s a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research, a libertarian think tank.

Disaster recovery

You can now get your hands on “Marketing in the time of COVID-19,” Ad Age’s new (free) white paper offering a deep data dive into what’s happened to marketers, media and brands during the coronavirus pandemic. Ad Age Datacenter produced the report based on data and analysis from Kantar. Get facts and stats on how the pandemic has affected ad spending, social media, consumer behavior, sports marketing, retailing and advertising creative. Download it here

$1

That’s the rumored sale price for Quartz, the business-news website, per the New York Post’s Keith Kelly. Publicly traded, Tokyo-based media/database conglomerate Uzabase bought it for $85 million just two years ago, but was apparently motivated to unload Quartz in a fire sale because of mounting losses.

This past Sunday, Zach Seward, Quartz’s co-founder and CEO, announced that he was taking Quartz private and that “I’m joined in this management buyout by Quartz’s editor in chief, Katherine Bell, and the rest of our staff, who will share equity in our new company.”

457,771

That’s the peak number of simultaneous viewers who watched the premiere of Billie Eilish’s video for her new song “Therefore I Am” at 1 p.m. ET on YouTube today. The video racked up more than 333,000 likes before it even started playing, as well as more than 1.5K dislikes—cuz, ya know, haters gonna hate. Watch the Eilish-directed music video here. (Spoiler: Chipotle and a few other restaurant chains will particularly enjoy it.). It’s been quite a couple of days for the 18-year-old, whose “Bad Guy” music video yesterday joined YouTube’s elite 1 billion views club.

The upside of tough times

Ad Age Datacenter’s Bradley Johnson has authored “Downtime Opportunity,” a 56-page white paper that examines marketing, product and media innovation in the worst of times from the Great Depression to the great coronavirus pandemic. Conclusion: Economic downturns reset the table for marketers and media, creating new rules, opportunities and brands. The report is available as a free download for Ad Age Insider and Ad Age Datacenter subscribers (or for purchase by everyone else) at AdAge.com/downtime2020.

Click for the quick take:  “How marketing can thrive in the worst of times.”

Also: Check out an election-themed take on that white paper by John Dioso, editor of Ad Age Studio 30: “Election 2020: It’s the end of the world as we know it (and we’ll be fine).”

Just briefly

“Florida Gov. DeSantis’s new data analyst: An anti-mask sports blogger pushing coronavirus conspiracies,” per The Washington Post.

“Bryson DeChambeau Is Wrecking Golf With Big Drives—and Bigger Data,” The Wall Street Journal reports.

“Europe charges Amazon with using dominance and data to squeeze rivals,” per Reuters.

“7 Ways HR Can Build a Fairer, Data-Informed Culture,” from the Harvard Business Review.

The newsletter is brought to you by Ad Age Datacenter, the industry’s most authoritative source of competitive intel and home to the Ad Age Leading National Advertisers, the Ad Age Agency Report: World’s Biggest Agency Companies and other exclusive data-driven reports. Access or subscribe to Ad Age Datacenter at AdAge.com/Datacenter.

Ad Age Datacenter is Kevin Brown, Bradley Johnson and Catherine Wolf.

This week’s newsletter was compiled and written by Simon Dumenco.

Welcome to Ad Age Datacenter Weekly, our data-obsessed newsletter for marketing and media professionals. Reading this online? Sign up to get it delivered to your inbox here.

Cancel culture

“Netflix has countered accusations that it disproportionately cancels more shows than other networks and platforms by revealing data around the percentage of shows that it renews,” Deadline’s Peter White reports. “The streamer’s Global Head of TV Bela Bajaria revealed that it has a program renewal rate of around 67%—something that she said was in line with industry standards.” The revelation came during the Paley International Council Summit. Keep reading here.

Previously:  “Netflix raises U.S. subscription price in sign of confidence” (Oct. 29), per Bloomberg News (via Ad Age).

Risk factor

“How likely is it you’ll encounter at least one person who is infected with the coronavirus if you go to a bar in Denver?,” asks Deborah Netburn of the Los Angeles Times. “What about a 100-person wedding in Baltimore? Or a Thanksgiving dinner with 25 guests in Los Angeles?”

Netburn serves up very specific numerical answers to the questions she poses with help from “the free, intuitive and now peer-reviewed” COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool out of Georgia Tech. Check out the tool here—and keep reading Netburn’s take on it here.

Masked data

As Phillip W. Magness writes in a guest post in The Wall Street Journal, “The top scientific journal Nature Medicine published a study on Oct. 23 with an astounding claim: By simply wearing masks at higher rates, Americans could prevent as many as 130,000 COVID-19 fatalities by the end of February 2021. Produced by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics Evaluation, or IHME, the study garnered immediate acclaim.”

But Magness thinks Nature Medicine has it all wrong, because the journal relied on outdated data about mask usage. There just isn’t that much more mask-adoption to be had in this country, he argues, which means the 130,000 lives-saved figure could be way overstated. Keep reading here.

Who is Magness?  His Twitter bio reads, “Economic & political historian. I do data analysis about the past & present. Lockdowns do not work.” He’s a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research, a libertarian think tank.

Disaster recovery

You can now get your hands on “Marketing in the time of COVID-19,” Ad Age’s new (free) white paper offering a deep data dive into what’s happened to marketers, media and brands during the coronavirus pandemic. Ad Age Datacenter produced the report based on data and analysis from Kantar. Get facts and stats on how the pandemic has affected ad spending, social media, consumer behavior, sports marketing, retailing and advertising creative. Download it here. 

$1

That’s the rumored sale price for Quartz, the business-news website, per the New York Post’s Keith Kelly. Publicly traded, Tokyo-based media/database conglomerate Uzabase bought it for $85 million just two years ago, but was apparently motivated to unload Quartz in a fire sale because of mounting losses.

This past Sunday, Zach Seward, Quartz’s co-founder and CEO, announced that he was taking Quartz private and that “I’m joined in this management buyout by Quartz’s editor in chief, Katherine Bell, and the rest of our staff, who will share equity in our new company.”

457,771

That’s the peak number of simultaneous viewers who watched the premiere of Billie Eilish’s video for her new song “Therefore I Am” at 1 p.m. ET on YouTube today. The video racked up more than 333,000 likes before it even started playing, as well as more than 1.5K dislikes—cuz, ya know, haters gonna hate. Watch the Eilish-directed music video here. (Spoiler: Chipotle and a few other restaurant chains will particularly enjoy it.). It’s been quite a couple of days for the 18-year-old, whose “Bad Guy” music video yesterday joined YouTube’s elite 1 billion views club.

The upside of tough times

Ad Age Datacenter’s Bradley Johnson has authored “Downtime Opportunity,” a 56-page white paper that examines marketing, product and media innovation in the worst of times from the Great Depression to the great coronavirus pandemic. Conclusion: Economic downturns reset the table for marketers and media, creating new rules, opportunities and brands. The report is available as a free download for Ad Age Insider and Ad Age Datacenter subscribers (or for purchase by everyone else) at AdAge.com/downtime2020.

Click for the quick take:  “How marketing can thrive in the worst of times.”

Also: Check out an election-themed take on that white paper by John Dioso, editor of Ad Age Studio 30: “Election 2020: It’s the end of the world as we know it (and we’ll be fine).”

Just briefly

• “Florida Gov. DeSantis’s new data analyst: An anti-mask sports blogger pushing coronavirus conspiracies,” per The Washington Post.

• “Bryson DeChambeau Is Wrecking Golf With Big Drives—and Bigger Data,” The Wall Street Journal reports.

• “Europe charges Amazon with using dominance and data to squeeze rivals,” per Reuters.

• “7 Ways HR Can Build a Fairer, Data-Informed Culture,” from the Harvard Business Review.

The newsletter is brought to you by Ad Age Datacenter, the industry’s most authoritative source of competitive intel and home to the Ad Age Leading National Advertisers, the Ad Age Agency Report: World’s Biggest Agency Companies and other exclusive data-driven reports. Access or subscribe to Ad Age Datacenter at AdAge.com/Datacenter.

Ad Age Datacenter is Kevin Brown, Bradley Johnson and Catherine Wolf.

This week’s newsletter was compiled and written by Simon Dumenco.Read MoreLatest News – Ad Age

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