Super Bowl Alert: Teaser time

Hello Super Bowl junkies,

I’m Jeanine Poggi, Ad Age’s senior editor, continuing our countdown to Super Bowl LV. In the days leading up to the game, which will, as of now, air on CBS on Feb. 7, Ad Age brings you breaking news, analysis and first looks at the high-stakes, Big Game commercials—all in our Super Bowl Alerts newsletter. Sign up right here to get them in your email.

#FlatMatthew revealed

Matthew McConaughey—not Matt Damon, as I first predicted—is the #FlatMatthew Doritos alluded to in its Super Bowl teaser last week, Ad Age’s Jessica Wohl reports. The second Doritos teaser shows a mom and two kids in the driveway, and one of the kids spots a dog with a leash leading up to the sky. Off screen, it seems, McConaughey is flying above like a kite, and he calls down for some help. McConaughey is certainly no stranger to the ad world, having appeared in multiple Lincoln campaigns, marketing for Wild Turkey, and voicing Carl’s Jr. spots in 2018.  

Doritos sibling Cheetos also dropped a second teaser this week, this one featuring Mila Kunis and “It Wasn’t Me” singer Shaggy, after the first, with Kunis’ husband Ashton Kutcher, debuted last week. Kunis and Kutcher are set to appear in the Cheetos ad together following last year’s divorce rumors that culminated with the couple’s hilarious Instagram video poking fun at the rumors.

Watch both teasers here.

Getting social

Triller, the video-making, social-networking platform, is expected to air its first Super Bowl commercial, Ad Age’s Garett Sloane reports. While Triller declined to comment, a person close to the company says that the app will appear in a national spot during the game. It’s still unknown what ad agency will help produce the ad, or the length of the spot. Triller’s decision comes after the app gained prominence this summer when it looked like Chinese-owned TikTok was in trouble in the U.S. While TikTok remains viable in the states, Triller is still looking to take a bigger stake in the space.

For decades, the Big Game has been a place for dotcom darlings to promote their businesses, but there is a mixed history for the brands. Some have floundered, like Quibi, which had a Super Bowl spot last year, and promptly went out of business. Other tech titans have made history at the Super Bowl, like Apple in 1984.

Triller joins a growing list of first-time Super Bowl advertisers, including online car seller Vroom, freelance platform Fiverr and Scotts Miracle-Gro. 

To keep track of all the advertisers running national spots in the game, bookmark Ad Age’s regularly updated Super Bowl ad chart.

Flashback

Pepsi and Coke are putting a hiatus on their long-standing rivalry, which is typically on display during the Super Bowl. Neither brand will run a stand-alone in-game ad, marking the first time in two decades that both cola giants will stay on the sidelines. So we took a trip down memory lane to revisit some of the best Super Bowl commercials from these two marketing stalwarts. From Mean Joe Green to Michael Jackson, here’s a look at some of the most memorable moments.

All of these ads, and more, can be found in the Ad Age Super Bowl Archive.

On the sidelines

Speaking of sitting on the sidelines, the latest two brands that won’t return to the game are Microsoft and Walmart. Microsoft has aired a spot in the last two Super Bowls. Last year’s commercial won praise for featuring Katie Sowers, a coach for the San Francisco 49ers, who became the first women ever to coach in the Super Bowl. Microsoft also aired spots in the 2014 and 2015 games.

Walmart will also not be reprising its 2020 Super Bowl appearance, a spokesperson confirmed. Last year, Walmart made its Super Bowl debut with an ad that featured scenes or characters from a dozen movies and TV shows, including Disney’s “Star Wars” and “Toy Story.”

Honoring health care workers 

The NFL will honor health care workers by giving away Super Bowl LV tickets to about 7,500 vaccinated health care workers in the Tampa and central Florida area. They will receive free tickets and game-day experiences. There will also be 14,500 additional fans in attendance at Raymond James Stadium.

Join Ad Age on Feb. 2 for a look at how brands are navigating the pandemic and addressing diversity in their ads for the 2021 game.

For more industry news and insight, follow us on Twitter: @adage.

From CMO Strategy to the Ad Age Datacenter Weekly, we’ve got newsletters galore. See them all here.

Subscribers make the difference. Individual, group and corporate subscriptions are available—including access to our Ad Age Datacenter. Find options at AdAge.com/membership.

Hello Super Bowl junkies,

I’m Jeanine Poggi, Ad Age’s senior editor, continuing our countdown to Super Bowl LV. In the days leading up to the game, which will, as of now, air on CBS on Feb. 7, Ad Age brings you breaking news, analysis and first looks at the high-stakes, Big Game commercials—all in our Super Bowl Alerts newsletter. Sign up right here to get them in your email.
#FlatMatthew revealed

Matthew McConaughey—not Matt Damon, as I first predicted—is the #FlatMatthew Doritos alluded to in its Super Bowl teaser last week, Ad Age’s Jessica Wohl reports. The second Doritos teaser shows a mom and two kids in the driveway, and one of the kids spots a dog with a leash leading up to the sky. Off screen, it seems, McConaughey is flying above like a kite, and he calls down for some help. McConaughey is certainly no stranger to the ad world, having appeared in multiple Lincoln campaigns, marketing for Wild Turkey, and voicing Carl’s Jr. spots in 2018.  

Doritos sibling Cheetos also dropped a second teaser this week, this one featuring Mila Kunis and “It Wasn’t Me” singer Shaggy, after the first, with Kunis’ husband Ashton Kutcher, debuted last week. Kunis and Kutcher are set to appear in the Cheetos ad together following last year’s divorce rumors that culminated with the couple’s hilarious Instagram video poking fun at the rumors.

Watch both teasers here.
Getting social

Triller, the video-making, social-networking platform, is expected to air its first Super Bowl commercial, Ad Age’s Garett Sloane reports. While Triller declined to comment, a person close to the company says that the app will appear in a national spot during the game. It’s still unknown what ad agency will help produce the ad, or the length of the spot. Triller’s decision comes after the app gained prominence this summer when it looked like Chinese-owned TikTok was in trouble in the U.S. While TikTok remains viable in the states, Triller is still looking to take a bigger stake in the space.

For decades, the Big Game has been a place for dotcom darlings to promote their businesses, but there is a mixed history for the brands. Some have floundered, like Quibi, which had a Super Bowl spot last year, and promptly went out of business. Other tech titans have made history at the Super Bowl, like Apple in 1984.

Triller joins a growing list of first-time Super Bowl advertisers, including online car seller Vroom, freelance platform Fiverr and Scotts Miracle-Gro. 

To keep track of all the advertisers running national spots in the game, bookmark Ad Age’s regularly updated Super Bowl ad chart.
Flashback

Pepsi and Coke are putting a hiatus on their long-standing rivalry, which is typically on display during the Super Bowl. Neither brand will run a stand-alone in-game ad, marking the first time in two decades that both cola giants will stay on the sidelines. So we took a trip down memory lane to revisit some of the best Super Bowl commercials from these two marketing stalwarts. From Mean Joe Green to Michael Jackson, here’s a look at some of the most memorable moments.

All of these ads, and more, can be found in the Ad Age Super Bowl Archive.
On the sidelines

Speaking of sitting on the sidelines, the latest two brands that won’t return to the game are Microsoft and Walmart. Microsoft has aired a spot in the last two Super Bowls. Last year’s commercial won praise for featuring Katie Sowers, a coach for the San Francisco 49ers, who became the first women ever to coach in the Super Bowl. Microsoft also aired spots in the 2014 and 2015 games.

Walmart will also not be reprising its 2020 Super Bowl appearance, a spokesperson confirmed. Last year, Walmart made its Super Bowl debut with an ad that featured scenes or characters from a dozen movies and TV shows, including Disney’s “Star Wars” and “Toy Story.”
Honoring health care workers 

The NFL will honor health care workers by giving away Super Bowl LV tickets to about 7,500 vaccinated health care workers in the Tampa and central Florida area. They will receive free tickets and game-day experiences. There will also be 14,500 additional fans in attendance at Raymond James Stadium.
Join Ad Age on Feb. 2 for a look at how brands are navigating the pandemic and addressing diversity in their ads for the 2021 game.

For more industry news and insight, follow us on Twitter: @adage.

From CMO Strategy to the Ad Age Datacenter Weekly, we’ve got newsletters galore. See them all here.

Subscribers make the difference. Individual, group and corporate subscriptions are available—including access to our Ad Age Datacenter. Find options at AdAge.com/membership.Read MoreLatest News – Ad Age

0 Comments